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Magnet Designation

How Spok Can Help You Achieve Magnet® Status

65% of Magnet-Designated Hospitals Use Spok® Solutions

Receiving a Magnet® designation is the ultimate credential for high-quality nursing. The American Nurses’ Credentialing Center (ANCC), an affiliate of the American Nurses Association, bestows this award on exceptional healthcare organizations that meet a rigorous set of standards for superior nursing processes and quality patient care. More than 400 Magnet facilities have been recognized for delivering superlative nursing care that leads to the highest levels of safety, quality, and patient satisfaction.

See how Magnet Facility Children’s Hospital Colorado minimized noise throughout the hospital and improved patient care and satisfaction.

Backed by Research

Numerous studies attest to the results from the Magnet Recognition Program® . Just some of the benefits include:

  • Greater job satisfaction for nurses—Nurse job satisfaction goes hand-in-hand with lower turnover and vacancy rates. An October 2011 study found that Magnet hospitals have better work environments, a more highly educated nursing workforce, superior nurse-to-patient staffing ratios, and higher nurse satisfaction than non-Magnet hospitals.
  • Better clinical outcomes—A 2013 study found that Magnet hospitals have a 14 percent lower mortality risk and 12 percent lower failure-to-rescue rates.
  • Greater profitability for hospitalsResearch by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative discovered that net patient revenue increased by 3.89 percent on average at Magnet Hospitals while costs increased by only 2.46 percent. Hospitals in the study that achieved Magnet status saw an increase in revenues of $1,229,779 to $1,263,926 annually.

How Spok Supports Your Magnet Journey

Hospitals pursuing Magnet status must follow specifications put forth by the Magnet Model, which provides a roadmap for achieving excellence in nursing practice. These guidelines are designed to enable hospitals to develop transformational leadership, structural empowerment, and exemplary professional practice, as well as new knowledge, innovations and improvements, and empirical outcomes.

Model Components

  • Transformational Leadership
  • Structural Empowerment
  • Exemplary Professional Practice
  • New Knowledge, Innovations & Improvements
  • Empirical Outcomes

Spok can help healthcare organizations with two of these Magnet model components: exemplary professional practice and new knowledge, and innovations and improvements. In particular, Spok Care Connect® can assist organizations with developing innovative processes that improve the effectiveness and efficiency of care services, and of interprofessional collaboration to ensure that care is well coordinated. By centralizing the management of critical alerts from patient monitoring systems, Spok can enhance communication and workflows to speed response times and improve patient care. Spok can also speed response times to patient requests and positively impact patient satisfaction scores.

The following are examples of how hospitals can employ Spok in their journey to achieving Magnet certification:

 Discover how Spok can help you innovate with new technology to improve the quality of care.

The following is an example of how hospitals can employ Spok in their journey to achieving Magnet certification:

Speeding Response to Patient Calls While Reducing Noise

The speed at which nurses respond to call buttons is a critical factor in the patient experience during a hospital stay. HCAHPS data presented through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality shows that the best hospitals respond to patients’ calls as quickly as patients wanted 83 percent of the time. But hospitals can score significantly below that level. Slow response rates are a symptom of inefficient processes. In many hospitals, when a patient presses the nurse call button, the call is routed to the central nursing station. Unit secretaries may not always be at the station, and the call can go unanswered for several minutes. Once the secretary does respond and asks the patient what he or she needs, it takes additional time to track down a nurse to fulfill the request. Alternatively, the staff at the station might use a noisy, public address announcement or alarm to contact the nurse. The patient waits while these processes run their course.

WITHOUT SPOK

With Spok, nurses receive patient calls directly on their mobile devices without noisy alerts or announcements. If the nurse is busy with another patient and declines or fails to pick up the call, Spok automatically forwards the notification to the next available staff member.  Improving the efficiency of the call answering process leads to faster responses and less noise, which increases patient satisfaction and minimizes alarm fatigue for staff.

WITH SPOK

With Spok, nurses receive patient calls directly on their mobile devices without noisy alerts or announcements. If the nurse is busy with another patient and declines or fails to pick up the call, Spok automatically forwards the notification to the next available staff member.  Improving the efficiency of the call answering process leads to faster responses and less noise, which increases patient satisfaction and minimizes alarm fatigue for staff.

Explore workflows where technology can help manage alarms and save time for providers.

Reducing Patient Falls

Falls are one of the most vexing patient safety problems facing hospitals. Between 700,000 and 1 million patients suffer a fall in U.S. hospitals each year, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Between 30 and 51 percent of these falls result in an injury, and a fall with injury is estimated to add 6.3 days to the length of the hospital stay and cost about $14,056.

Spok solutions help reduce the risk of falls. Many hospitals today rely on beds that are programmed to sound an alarm when the patient gets out of bed. This noise alerts caregivers to come to the room immediately to keep the patient from falling.

Spok improves this process by sending the bed alert to a group of unit staff on their mobile devices. As the nurse rushes to the room, they can hit the call-back feature and instruct the patient to sit down. The patient will often comply, giving the provider more time to reach the patient.

Learn about three common workflows that can be simplified with mobile communications.

Cutting Down Alarm Fatigue

Go into almost any hospital and you’ll hear a constant stream of beeps.  These alarms communicate vital information. But often, the number of alarms can be overwhelming. For example, an analysis at Boston Medical Center found that the hospital was experiencing 12,000 alarms a day. Excessive numbers of alarms lead to “alarm fatigue” that desensitizes the staff, increasing the risk that an important alarm will be missed.

Inefficient processes contribute to the problem of alarm fatigue. Many hospitals have telemetry ‘war rooms’ staffed with a technician monitoring several patients. When an alarm is triggered, for example by a change in the patient’s heart rhythm, the tech has to look up which nurse is assigned to that room and determine the type of device he or she is carrying in order to send that nurse a notification. If the assigned nurse is unable to check on the patient immediately, the tech has to repeat the identification and dial process for an escalation contact. This inefficiency results in unnecessary alerts and delayed response.

Spok Care Connect streamlines the alerting process. Alarm notifications trigger a call directly to the tech’s phone. He or she looks at that patient’s monitor to evaluate the alarm. If the alarm is a false positive, the tech won’t disrupt the nurse. If the alert is actionable, the tech can easily forward the notice directly to the patient’s nurse. If the nurse is busy and declines the alert, the software instantly escalates the notice to another care provider. This workflow saves manual steps and time while reducing alarm fatigue because nurses don’t receive as many false positives.